After resisting the 3D animation craze for several years, legendary studio Ghibli is releasing its first feature film. Directed by the son of the prestigious Hayao Miyazaki, Aya and the witch, has an update been announced? Critical.

For decades, studio Ghibli has been the benchmark in Japanese animation. Thanks to Hayao Miyazaki’s signature pencil strokes, it quickly became a factory for dreamlike and deeply involved masterpieces. This special place in the animation scene is undoubtedly due to the company’s creative choice to always favor more traditional animation techniques rather than succumbing to the digital masterpiece race we observe in its competitors. A strategy that goes against the grain that so far seems to be paying off. While it didn’t surprise audiences at the announcement of the release of Aya and the Witch, Ghibli’s first 3D feature film.

To make this turning point towards modernity, Ghibli again turns to the bibliography of Diana Wynne Jones, which inspired Howl’s Moving Castle. After the adventures of young Sophie, Ghibli tells us here the story of an orphan who is adopted by two strange characters: Bella Yaga and Mandrake. In this scary house, she is about to make a strange discovery, her two new parents are none other than witches. That’s when his apprenticeship will begin.

With its unified setting, the feature film taking place almost entirely behind closed doors, Aya and the Witch is far from the outlandish entertainment it advertises. If the trailers depict an adventure of course much more poetic than usual, but funny enough and without a hitch, the scenario takes its toll on the carpet. Punctuated by some interesting sequences, the new film is just over 1 hour 22 minutes long and sorely lacking in rhythm. Kind of an indigestible mille-feuille scriptwriting, Goro Miyazaki’s new feature film takes almost all the flaws of its previous production and fails to free itself from its role as entertainment for the cherubs.

But Ghibli has all the cards in his hands. With themes such as maturity and heredity, Goro Miyazaki could have delivered a touching story about the search for his origins and discovering the differences. However, the unbearable Aya doesn’t manage to move us, just like the other protagonists.

A real disdain for his father’s work, with Aya and the wizard Goro Miyazaki trying to register in total contradiction to the previous achievements of studio Ghibli. A bias that can pay off, if not too boring and childish.

Out of Japan, this time Ghibli takes us to England in the 70s. If this isn’t the first time the studio has left the Levant country, it’s been exploring the Italian Riviera with Porco Rosso, strength to note that with Aya and the Witches this postulate is almost obsolete because the decor doesn’t exist. Visually, they are sorely lacking in scale and this is especially felt in such an impersonal home. This lack of detail is undoubtedly related to digital animations with flat reliefs such as character electrocardiograms. Crafted from hurdles and endings, this feature film answers the studio’s ambition, namely to create cartoons that are barely pleasing to the eye on small screens. There’s nothing surprising when you know that it’s considered a TV movie for Japan.

For what makes this studio famous, there is no doubt the diversity of its decorations and the meticulousness of its creators in placing these epic dreamlike images all over Japan. Disappointment is immense when one finds oneself in front of this undefined adventure and its frozen and rigid characters on screen. The “character design” is downright ugly, and it’s enough to make us want to come back. We’ll end with the music, which is far from what Ghibli is used to. Here, the feature film tries to take its inspiration from the British side of rock, but here again Aya and the Witch doesn’t hit the mark.

Ghibli wanted to make a change towards 3D, but unfortunately halfway through. If the film’s ending calls for a sequel, one can’t really ask the studio to stop here. That’s why we can’t wait for Miyazaki’s return for the next feature film

Directed by the son of the prestigious Hayao Miyazaki, Aya and the witch, is the renewal announced? Critical.

Thanks to Hayao Miyazaki’s so characteristic pencil stroke, it quickly became a factory for dreamlike and deeply engaged masterpieces.While it was not the surprise of the spectators at the announcement of the release of Aya and the Witch, Ghibli’s first 3D feature film.

In this frightening house, she will make a strange discovery, her two new parents are none other than wizards. It is then that his apprenticeship will begin.

By D14N