REVIEW IT ‘CHAPTER 2’

After successfully captivating film lovers and winning preat the box office for best-selling horror ranked first (the Forbes magazine version), the long-awaited IT sequel is back in 2019 with the title IT: Chapter Two. His first film (IT – 2017) was a huge success because it presented the best adaptation story, the scary and iconic character of the clown Pennywise, and the children’s cast who played brilliantly. Even Stephen King the novelist gave praise for the adaptation of his novel into a film form because he did not expect the results to be so good. The film IT Chapter Two continues the adventure story of The Losers Club back to Derry 27 years later after they became adults. This film is also the conclusion of the IT Novel, which part of the story has been filmed in the first film.

After 27 years after the adventure of The Losers Club defeating Pennywise/IT (Bill Skarsgård), the clown Pennywise is back to launch his terror in the city of Derry. The children of The Losers Club members have now grown up and they have been separated from each other to live their own lives. There is only one child who remains in the city, namely Mike (Isaiah Mustafa) and Mike calls all his childhood friends again because the children have disappeared again, a sign that Pennywise is back in action. Initially good Bill (James McAvoy), Beverly (Jessica Chastain), Ben (Jay Ryan), Ritchie (Bill Hader), Eddie (James Ransone), and Stan (Andy Bean) are reluctant to return to the city of Derry but because Mike reminds them of their vows and the danger that threatens to disturb their hearts, one by one they finally agree to travel to Derry to gather. Haunted by the fear and trauma of their childhood in the city of Derry, once again they must prepare themselves against Pennywise who this time awaits them with a vengeance. The Losers Club who have now grown up must work together to stop the Pennywise / IT terror from recurring and destroy Pennywise once and for all.

One thing that needs to be criticized from IT Chapter Two is the run time factor (duration) of this film which is quite long, namely 169 minutes, which is quite tiring for viewers who are not used to watching long durations. This happens because IT Chapter Two has a complexity in terms of story, besides that the director also wants to present a richer story about friendship and how The Losers Club was finally able to conquer their greatest fear. All of these things are built slowly in the story and it is very clear that Muschietti gives a more dominant portion to the story of the solidarity and friendship of the Losers Club personnel. Overall, this film is a satisfying conclusion from the IT Novel adaptation and manages to give a different color to the horror genre, but the level of horror and horror is quite reduced compared to the first film. The storyline is arguably slow and quite thick with elements of drama when telling the past of each member of The Losers Club. The new story begins to get interesting when they begin to meet again with Pennywise and his various forms as a result of the manifestation of their respective fears. For the horror scene itself when Pennywise appears and preys on children, it is still scary and has an unexpected shock effect because it seems to force the audience to witness the horror without being able to do anything but witness the tragic fate of the victims. The storyline is arguably slow and quite thick with elements of drama when telling the past of each member of The Losers Club. The new story begins to get interesting when they begin to meet again with Pennywise and his various forms as a result of the manifestation of their respective fears. For the horror scene itself when Pennywise appears and preys on children, it is still scary and has an unexpected shock effect because it seems to force the audience to witness the horror without being able to do anything but witness the tragic fate of the victims. The storyline is arguably slow and quite thick with elements of drama when telling the past of each member of The Losers Club. The new story begins to get interesting when they begin to meet again with Pennywise and his various forms as a result of the manifestation of their respective fears. For the horror scene itself when Pennywise appears and preys on children, it is still scary and has an unexpected shock effect because it seems to force the audience to witness the horror without being able to do anything but witness the tragic fate of the victims.

It’s a good idea to re-watch the first film to be able to remember the key characters in the film. However, the efforts made by Muschietti through the introduction of The Losers Club characters and their backgrounds are quite helpful for the audience to remember the characters even though in reality not all characters stand out in the story. The flashback moments accompanied by important details about the characters as they go on an adventure to find artifacts from the past to defeat Pennywise are the most interesting parts of the film’s story. Because in this section we see Muschietti’s skill in presenting stories through transitions from the past to the present. Although not a comedy genre, the presence of Bill Hader through the adult Ritchie character in this film who works as a stand-up comedian is able to entertain the audience when the situation is tense.

For the production design and cinematography, this film deserves a thumbs up because Muschietti is a director who really pays attention to the visual aspects of his films. Together with their creative team consisting of Checco Varese (Director of Photography), Luis Sequira (Costume Designer), Paul Austerberry (Production Designer), and Benjamin Wallfisch (Composer), they worked hard to present story visualizations that supported the story very well. . The way Muschietti presents the transition from 1989 to the present in a back to back way is very memorable through the selection of dialogue lines that connect the adult characters with their younger versions, and the use of important locations in the film which is also shown through flashbacks such as the occasional mirror of the past with the metamorphosis of the characters’ faces. from children’s to adult versions. This transition is supported by slick cinematography because the color tones and characteristics of each era are displayed without losing their trademark. Port Hope, Ontario was used as the setting for the City of Derry for the two IT films. Some of the important locations that are quite eye-catching in the film are the underground headquarters where The Losers Club gathered as children, the Jade of The Orient where the adult Losers reunite together for the first time at the beginning of the film, and the Carnival Canal Day Festival in the City of Derry. The musical score arranged by Benjamin Wallfisch is able to support every moment in the film effectively, both during horror situations and during dramatic moments experienced by the characters when remembering bad things that happened in their past.

In terms of the cast, Jessica Chastain, Bill Hader, Isaiah Mustafa, Jay Ryan, James Ransone, James McAvoy, and Andy Bean played their characters well. Their acting as the adult version of Beverly, Ritchie, Mike, Ben, Eddie, Bill, Stan, Beverly, and Eddie is quite interesting and each has its own personality but lacks ‘charm’ as the acting of the child actors looks more compact and live out their character. For adult The Losers characters, the characters Bill, Beverly, and Ritchie are the most prominent while Stan and Eddie are less explored. Ben’s adult character lacks the conflict his character experienced as a child. The returning child characters of The Losers Club are played by Jaeden Martell (Bill), Sophia Lillis (Beverly), Finn Wolfhard (Richie), Jack Dylan Grazer (Eddie), Jeremy Ray Taylor (Ben), Chosen Jacobs (Mike), and Wyatt Oleff (Stanley) although only as supporters but act as shadows throughout the film. They fill in the scenes that did not appear in the first film which also serves as a reminder and a common thread for the audience. The presence of this cast of children really helps the audience to remember the details and events in the first film while still showing the warmth of friendship between them. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre. and Wyatt Oleff (Stanley) although only as a support but act as a shadow throughout the film. They fill in the scenes that did not appear in the first film which also serves as a reminder and a common thread for the audience. The presence of this cast of children really helps the audience to remember the details and events in the first film while still showing the warmth of friendship between them. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre. and Wyatt Oleff (Stanley) although only as a support but act as a shadow throughout the film. They fill in the scenes that did not appear in the first film which also serves as a reminder and a common thread for the audience. The presence of this cast of children really helps the audience to remember the details and events in the first film while still showing the warmth of friendship between them. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre. They fill in the scenes that did not appear in the first film which also serves as a reminder and a common thread for the audience. The presence of this cast of children really helps the audience to remember the details and events in the first film while still showing the warmth of friendship between them. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre. They fill in the scenes that did not appear in the first film which also serves as a reminder and a common thread for the audience. The presence of this cast of children really helps the audience to remember the details and events in the first film while still showing the warmth of friendship between them. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre. Bill Skarsgård again performed brilliantly as Pennywise the clown incarnate the devil, as if this role was created for him. His face and expression as the clown Pennywise is one of the best characterizations of a villain in the horror genre.

Through IT Chapter Two, Muschietti tries to raise important issues around childhood trauma, bullying, and violence against children, especially those experienced by Ben and Beverly, which are often experienced by children their age due to their physical appearance and behavior that is considered unable to adapt to the surrounding community. Bullying is indeed rife in the lives of children and what Muschietti describes reminds us that the effects of this can last into character into adulthood. The guilt in the past like what Bill experienced through the death of his sister Georgie is like a reflection for the audience that sometimes bad events in the past will always haunt us as long as we can’t come to terms with the incident. How we deal with the secrets of the past is also shown through the story of Ritchie’s character. Through IT, there is actually a message that each of us has the greatest fear that we must face so that we can move forward. Another thing that stands out in a story that is very well represented is the beauty of friendship that can last into adulthood and all the nostalgic effects that follow. Watching this part will surely take the audience back to the memory of childhood friends and all the sweet stories behind them. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world. Through IT, there is actually a message that each of us has the greatest fear that we must face so that we can move forward. Another thing that stands out in a story that is very well represented is the beauty of friendship that can last into adulthood and all the nostalgic effects that follow. Watching this part will surely take the audience back to the memory of childhood friends and all the sweet stories behind them. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world. Through IT, there is actually a message that each of us has the greatest fear that we must face so that we can move forward. Another thing that stands out in a story that is very well represented is the beauty of friendship that can last into adulthood and all the nostalgic effects that follow. Watching this part will surely take the audience back to the memory of childhood friends and all the sweet stories behind them. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world. Another thing that stands out in a story that is very well represented is the beauty of friendship that can last into adulthood and all the nostalgic effects that follow. Watching this part will surely take the audience back to the memory of childhood friends and all the sweet stories behind them. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world. Another thing that stands out in a story that is very well represented is the beauty of friendship that can last into adulthood and all the nostalgic effects that follow. Watching this part will surely take the audience back to the memory of childhood friends and all the sweet stories behind them. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world. A simple question arises after watching whether there are childhood friends with whom we are still on good terms? Maybe a reunion can be the answer to treating homesickness as well as updating the latest news about friends in an increasingly individualistic world.