REVIEW: THE INVISIBLE MAN

Posted under Movies On By Ihasopia

Most of us must still remember an ambitious project by the name of ‘The Dark Universe’ which was announced in 2016. Which in the universe brings together classic monsters under the Universal Studio banner where Dracula, Frakeinstein, The Invisible Man, The Mummy, The Wolfman and even Van Helsing are met in the same universe. Unfortunately, the project was canceled after the universe opener, which started with ‘The Mummy’, starring Tom Cruise, failed miserably. Initially, if The Mummy is successful, The Invisible Man will follow in production with Johnny Depp who will play the character. 4 Years later The Invisible Man is still present which takes a reboot or modernization of the 1933 version which is a standalone film without being associated with ‘

Cecilia Kass (Elisabeth Moss) runs away from her husband Adrian Griffin (Oliver Jackson-Cohen). This escape was made because Cecilia had a toxic relationship with Adrian who was very possessive and temperamental with a background of a rich and brilliant scientist. Cecilia tried to run away when Adrian was sleeping due to a sedative that was deliberately mixed in his drink. With the help of her sister Emily (Harriet Dyer), Cecillia manages to escape and hide in the house of James (Aldis Hodge), Emily’s friend who is a police officer and the single parent of a teenage daughter named Sydney (Strom Reid).

2 weeks after escaping Cecilia’s condition did not improve and instead was haunted by worries and paranoia if Adrian would find her hiding place. He was constantly overshadowed by anxiety, so he did not dare to leave the house. Until finally a news stated that Adrian had died. Adrian is suspected of committing suicide. The news of Adrian’s suicide was followed by another surprise, which turned out to be Adrian bequeathed all his enormous fortune to Cecilia. However, the calm and relief Cecilia found was only temporary. Cecilia felt that something strange had started to follow since the news of Adrian’s death. Cecillia believes Adrian is still alive and still stalks her because of the terror after terror she received from an unseen figure. The thing that made Cecilia’s sanity was questioned by those around her. Armed with a sense of belief, Cecilia is determined to prove that Adian is still alive because the existence of an invisible figure begins to threaten the people she cares about.

The initial 10 minutes are key. The first 10 minutes, which I can say with vocals, is one of the best opening scenes in a movie I’ve ever watched. It’s been a long time since I felt an opening moment like this. Leigh Whannell’s genius as a director deserves praise. While we haven’t been given a chance to get to know the main character of this film, we have been brought into the tense moments experienced by the character Cecilia, played beautifully by Elisabeth Moss. Whannell’s skill in placing the scene of Cecilia’s anxiety and discomfort can be felt by the audience. The first 10 minutes are the beginning of many tense moments that make the gymnastics audience heart. Trust me.

One of the unique things about The Invisible Man is that it combines 3 genres at once in one film, from sci-fi, thriller and horror, all of which are perfectly mixed by Whannell, who also wrote the script himself. Although the horror or thriller in this film is not supernatural, the goosebumps and creepy effects that we encounter in Insidious feel very strong. With a story plot that is not extraordinary Whannell knows clearly where this film has advantages. Namely creating an uncomfortable atmosphere in the room or feeling watched as we encounter in the films Insidious.

Then for the players, seeing the slick appearance of Elisabeth Moss who followed The Handmaids Tale series, I’m sure I won’t be surprised anymore to see her performance in this film. Coincidentally, the two characters played by Elisabeth Moss tell the story of a woman trapped in a situation whose control is held by someone else. Seeing Cecilia here is a kind of development from June Osborne’s character in The Hanmaids Tale which is very easy to make the audience feel involved and feel what the character feels.

For me The Invisible Man is one of the films that has the best opening scene I have ever watched. Universal’s decision to take Blumhouse with Jason Blum as its head seemed to be a decision they made after the monster-verse plan failed miserably. Without being burdened and having to connect it with other films, the duo Blum and Whannell have done their job well in this film.